Last edited by Brataxe
Sunday, October 11, 2020 | History

5 edition of Health effects of exposure to radon found in the catalog.

Health effects of exposure to radon

time for reassessment?

  • 100 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by National Academy Press in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radon -- Health aspects.,
  • Radon -- Toxicology.,
  • Radiation carcinogenesis.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementCommittee on Health Effects of Exposure to Radon (BEIR VI), Board on Radiation Effects Research, Commission on Life Sciences, National Research Council.
    SeriesBEIR ;, 6, BEIR (Series) ;, 6.
    ContributionsNational Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Health Effects of Exposure to Radon.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRA1247.R33 H43 1994
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvii, 94 p. :
    Number of Pages94
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1124922M
    ISBN 100309050871
    LC Control Number94066478

    Purpose: Radon is natural radioactive noble gas that can be found in soil, water, outdoor and indoor air. Exposure to radon accounts for more that 50% of the annual effective dose of natural. This book evaluates recently published data related to the risk associated with human exposure to radon and radon progeny and assesses whether sufficient and appropriate new information is available to deem necessary a reassessment of health risks due to exposure to radon.

    Radiation exposure from radon is indirect. The health hazard from radon does not come primarily from radon itself, but rather from the radioactive products formed in the decay of radon. The general effects of radon to the human body are caused by its radioactivity and consequent risk of radiation-induced cancer. The only known health effect from exposure to radon is the increased risk of developing lung cancer. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, after smoking. Extensive epidemiological evidence from studies of underground uranium miners, complemented by recent residential radon studies in Europe and North America, have shown that there.

    Radon is a gas that you cannot smell, taste or see. Radon forms naturally when uranium, radium and thorium break down in rocks, soil and groundwater. People can be exposed to radon primarily from breathing radon in air that comes through cracks and gaps in buildings and homes. Breathing in radon can cause health problems. Radon and public health This AGIR report (RCE) reviews the evidence of the effects of exposure to radon, and its decay products, on health. Published 1 June


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Health effects of exposure to radon Download PDF EPUB FB2

Public Summary: The Health Effects of Exposure to Indoor Radon Radon is a naturally occurring gas that seeps out of rocks and soil.

Radon comes from uranium that has been in the ground since the time the earth was formed, and the rate of radon seepage is variable, partly because the amounts of uranium in the soil vary considerably.

A compilation of reports to study the effects of radon on the body. Covers topics such as cell lethality, mutation of cells, and carcinogenisis in laboratory animals.4/5(1).

Other health effects of radon have not consistently been demonstrated. The proportion of all lung cancers linked to radon is estimated to lie between 3% and 14%, depending on the average radon concentrationin the country and on the method of calculation.

Radon is the second most important cause of lung cancer after smoking in many countries. Lung cancer now surpasses breast cancer as the number one cause of death among women. A smoker who is also exposed to radon has a much higher risk of lung cancer.

Radon is the number one cause of lung cancer among non-smokers, according to EPA estimates. Overall, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer.

Unlike with other gases like carbon monoxide, you won’t have symptoms of radon poisoning right away. Instead, health problems from the exposure, such as lung cancer, show up after many years.

Lung. High radon exposure is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Radon is a noble gas (reactive compound), and is quickly exhaled after being breathed in. Radon progeny (decayed products) combined with other air molecules, such as dust particles and smoke, can be deposited in the airway of the lungs and become harmful.

Health Physics Society. Wow, you really have done your homework. If you have not already read this book, you will find Health Effects of Exposure to Radon (BEIR VI) of interest. The book can be downloaded for free from the National Research Council’s website.

When you start getting into precise calculations of risk, the details get a little confusing. Radon gas can damage cells in your lungs, which can lead to cancer. Radon is responsible for ab lung cancer deaths each year Author: Ann Pietrangelo. As I noted, the risk of lung cancer from exposure to radon (actually the radioactive decay products of radon, commonly called radon daughters or radon progeny) depends on the cumulative exposure over a lifetime.

The risk factors have been estimated based on epidemiologic studies of underground miners and residential indoor exposures. Radon Health Effects Lung Cancer. Radon is one of the leading causes of lung cancer, along with smoking and secondhand ’s blamed for up 14 percent of lung cancer cases exposure is responsible for ab lung cancer deaths every year, and about 2, of those deaths occur among people who have never smoked.

Radon progeny--the decay products of radon gas--are a well-recognized cause of lung cancer in miners working underground. When radon was found to be a ubiquitous indoor air pollutant, however, it raised a more widespread alarm for public health.

Smokers are at higher risk of developing Radon-induced lung cancer. Lung cancer is the only health effect which has been definitively linked with radon exposure. Lung cancer would usually occur years () after exposure. Public Summary: The Health Effects of Exposure to Indoor Radon Radon is a naturally occurring gas that seeps out of rocks and soil.

Radon comes from uranium that has been in the ground since the time the earth was formed, and the rate of radon seepage is very variable, partly because the amounts of uranium in the soil vary considerably. Breathing radon does not cause any short-term health effects such as shortness of breath, coughing, headaches, or fever.

Inthe National Academy of Sciences (NAS) released the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VI) Report, "The Health Effects of Exposure to Indoor Radon." The study reviewed and evaluated data from many prior.

Radon gas decays into radioactive particles that can get trapped into your lungs when you breathe. As they break down further, these particles release small bursts of energy.

This can damage lung tissue and lead to lung cancer over the course of your lifetime. Not everyone exposed to elevated levels of radon will develop lung cancer.

about radon exposure and its health e ects have increased gr eatly due to mass media reports of high concentrations of radon be- ing released from various close-to-life products, such as mat.

Radon (Rn) is a naturally occurring element that develops from the radioactive decay of radium. Health authorities consider it a health hazard because of its radioactivity. The United States.

Health effects of exposure to radon. National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Health Risks of Exposure to Radon.

Publication date. Topics. Health risk assessment, Indoor air pollution, Radiation carcinogenesis, Radon, Radon, Radon. : The World Health Organization considers that radon exposure is the second most common cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking. 37 Moreover, since even low concentrations of radon exposure can also result in a small increase in the risk of lung cancer, a national radon policy is needed to reduce the risk of lung cancer and raise public.

The National Radon Action Plan: A Strategy for Saving Lives sets out strategies to drive the changes needed to reduce exposure to radon, a naturally occurring, invisible and odorless gas. This plan was released by the American Lung Association on November 9, Read the National Radon Action Plan on the American Lung Association’s website here pdf icon [PDF – kb] external icon.

they are very much lower than permissible exposure limits (PEL). Accordingly, only artificially enhanced concentrations of environmental radon would be sufficiently high that provisions of 29 CFR would go into effect.

The most common places for significant artificial enhancement of radon .Additional Physical Format: Online version: Health effects of exposure to radon. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, (OCoLC)Get this from a library! Health effects of exposure to radon.

[National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Health Risks of Exposure to Radon.;] -- To develop appropriate public policy for indoor radon, decisionmakers need an accurate characterization of the risk of radon exposure and the ranges of exposures people actually receive.

In response.